D.W.WINNICOTT PLAYING AND REALITY PDF

Sir John Frederick Winnicott was a merchant who was knighted in after serving twice as mayor of Plymouth. Winnicott described himself as a disturbed adolescent, reacting against his own self-restraining "goodness" acquired from trying to assuage the dark moods of his mother. He first thought of studying medicine while at The Leys School , a boarding school in Cambridge , after fracturing his clavicle and recording in his diary that he wished he could treat himself. He began pre-clinical studies at Jesus College, Cambridge in but, with the onset of World War I , his studies were interrupted when he was made a medical trainee at the temporary hospital in Cambridge. During this time, he learned from his mentor the art of listening carefully when taking medical histories from patients, a skill that he would later identify as foundational to his practice as a psychoanalyst.

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Sir John Frederick Winnicott was a merchant who was knighted in after serving twice as mayor of Plymouth. Winnicott described himself as a disturbed adolescent, reacting against his own self-restraining "goodness" acquired from trying to assuage the dark moods of his mother. He first thought of studying medicine while at The Leys School , a boarding school in Cambridge , after fracturing his clavicle and recording in his diary that he wished he could treat himself.

He began pre-clinical studies at Jesus College, Cambridge in but, with the onset of World War I , his studies were interrupted when he was made a medical trainee at the temporary hospital in Cambridge. During this time, he learned from his mentor the art of listening carefully when taking medical histories from patients, a skill that he would later identify as foundational to his practice as a psychoanalyst.

Career Edit Winnicott completed his medical studies in , and in , the same year as his marriage to the artist Alice Buxton Winnicott born Taylor. Alice had "severe psychological difficulties" and Winnicott arranged for her, and his own therapy, to address the difficulties this condition created.

In he began a ten-year psychoanalysis with James Strachey , and in he began training as an analytic candidate. During the war, he met and worked with Clare Britton, a psychiatric social worker who became his colleague in treating children displaced from their homes by wartime evacuation. Winnicott was lecturing after the war and Janet Quigley and Isa Benzie of the BBC asked him to give over sixty talks on the radio between and His first series of talks in was titled "Happy Children.

Among contemporaries influenced by Winnicott was R. Laing , who wrote to Winnicott in acknowledging his help. Winnicott divorced his first wife in and married Clare Britton — in A keen observer of children as a social worker and a psychoanalyst in her own right, she had an important influence on the development of his theories and likely acted as midwife to his prolific publications after they met.

Winnicott died on 25 January , following the last of a series of heart attacks and was cremated in London.

Clare Winnicott oversaw the posthumous publication of several of his works. It is likely that he first came upon this notion from his collaboration in wartime with the psychiatric social worker, Clare Britton, later a psychoanalyst and his second wife who in published an article on the importance of play for children. Winnicott believed that it was only in playing that people are entirely their true selves, so it followed that for psychoanalysis to be effective, it needed to serve as a mode of playing.

Two of the techniques whereby Winnicott used play in his work with children were the squiggle game and the spatula game. If the mother never responded playfully, sooner or later the baby would stop trying to elicit play from her.

Indeed, Winnicott came to consider that "Playing takes place in the potential space between the baby and the mother-figure In health, the child learns to bring his or her spontaneous, real self into play with others; in a false self disorder, the child has found it unsafe or impossible to do so, and instead feels compelled to hide the true self from other people, and pretend to be whatever they want instead.

For Winnicott, the self is a very important part of mental and emotional well-being which plays a vital role in creativity. He thought that people were born without a clearly developed self and had to "search" for an authentic sense of self as they grew.

This experience of aliveness is what allows people to be genuinely close to others, and to be creative. Winnicott thought that the "True Self" begins to develop in infancy, in the relationship between the baby and its primary caregiver Winnicott typically refers to this person as "the mother". She also gains a sense that she is real, that she exists and her feelings and actions have meaning. Winnicott thought that one of the developmental hurdles for an infant to get past is the risk of being traumatised by having to be too aware too soon of how small and helpless she really is.

A baby who is too aware of real-world dangers will be too anxious to learn optimally. A good-enough parent is well enough attuned and responsive to protect the baby with an illusion of omnipotence , or being all-powerful.

To feel this powerful, Winnicott thought, allowed a baby to feel confident, calm and curious, and able to learn without having to invest a lot of energy into defences. Winnicott thought that in health, a False Self was what allowed one to present a "polite and mannered attitude" [42] in public.

But he saw more serious emotional problems in patients who seemed unable to feel spontaneous, alive or real to themselves anywhere, in any part of their lives, yet managed to put on a successful "show of being real".

Such patients suffered inwardly from a sense of being empty, dead or "phoney". He thought that parents did not need to be perfectly attuned, but just "ordinarily devoted" or "good enough" to protect the baby from often experiencing overwhelming extremes of discomfort and distress, emotional or physical.

But babies who lack this kind of external protection, Winnicott thought, had to do their best with their own crude defences. Winnicott saw this as an unconscious process: not only others but also the person himself would mistake his False Self for his real personality. But even with the appearance of success, and of social gains, he would feel unreal and lack the sense of really being alive or happy.

However it is not a close equation as the Id, Ego and Superego are complex and dynamic inter-related systems that do not fit well into such a dichotomy. The theory more closely resembles Carl Rogers simplified notions of the Real and Ideal self. According to Winnicott, in every person the extent of division between True and False Self can be placed on a continuum between the healthy and the pathological. The healthy False Self feels that it is still being true to the True Self. It can be compliant to expectations but without feeling that it has betrayed its "True Self".

Winnicott on C. He goes on to comment on the relationship between Freud and Jung. His view of the environment and use of accessible everyday language, addressing the parent community, as opposed to just the Kleinian psychoanalytic community, may account in part for the distancing and making him somewhat "niche".

Britton and D. Winnicott, "The problem of homeless children". The New Era in Home and School. Jung London: Collins and Routledge, Donald W.

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Sir John Frederick Winnicott was a merchant who was knighted in after serving twice as mayor of Plymouth. Winnicott described himself as a disturbed adolescent, reacting against his own self-restraining "goodness" acquired from trying to assuage the dark moods of his mother. He first thought of studying medicine while at The Leys School , a boarding school in Cambridge , after fracturing his clavicle and recording in his diary that he wished he could treat himself. He began pre-clinical studies at Jesus College, Cambridge in but, with the onset of World War I , his studies were interrupted when he was made a medical trainee at the temporary hospital in Cambridge. During this time, he learned from his mentor the art of listening carefully when taking medical histories from patients, a skill that he would later identify as foundational to his practice as a psychoanalyst. Career[ edit ] Winnicott completed his medical studies in , and in , the same year as his marriage to the artist Alice Buxton Winnicott born Taylor. Alice had "severe psychological difficulties" and Winnicott arranged for her, and his own therapy, to address the difficulties this condition created.

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