SONG OF LAWINO AND SONG OF OCOL PDF

He rejected the Christian faith of his parents in the early s, and wrote his most famous works in his native Acoli rather than in English. His essays ruthlessly critique Africans who have fallen under the spell of such European ideas as Christianity or socialism. His scholarly work provides a deeply sympathetic defense of Acoli culture. Far less numerous than the Buganda or Banyoro peoples, the Acoli reside in the elevated grasslands of northwest Uganda. They are a subgroup of the Luo people, and they speak a Nilotic language unlike their Bantu neighbors to the South.

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Gerald Moore From the Reviews: "In rewriting his poem in English he has chosen a strong, simple idiom which preserves the sharpness and frankness of this imagery, a structure of short, free verses which flow swiftly and easily, and an uncondescending offer of all that is local and specific to the original W hat survives is enough to offer one of the most varied and exciting contributions yet made to English poetry in Africa.

Similarly the illustrative quotes chosen here are merely those the complete review subjectively believes represent the tenor and judgment of the review as a whole. We acknowledge and remind and warn you that they may, in fact, be entirely unrepresentative of the actual reviews by any other measure. Heron notes in his Introduction, Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol: are not songs in any literal sense.

You cannot sing them. They are not simply a written version of Acoli songs. Acoli songs do not grow to book length. They are one or two verses repeated with musical accompaniment. For all the local universality of its arguments, it is not a communal work but an individual and personal one, the poet giving voice to a strong leading figure, Lawino. It is a litany of specifics, bitter complaints about her husband, Ocol -- even as their individual differences are representative for two camps, one espousing the entirely traditional Lawino , the other looking only towards a European-culture-guided future Ocol.

Clearly, this gives a different feel to the work, but it seems reasonably successful. In separate chapters, Lawino addresses the variety of differences between the traditional that Ocol now rejects but which she still clings to and the new, which he has embraced entirely.

He is disrespectful of his parents and of family in general, and not welcoming in the way expected of him, barring visitors because, among other reasons: They ruin his nicely polished floor With the mud in their feet.

Why should you despise yours? Yet ultimately she too seems to judge reflexively: for Ocol all things Western are unquestionably superior; in reaction, she finds only flaws and no potential positives while wholeheartedly endorsing the entirely traditional. There is no middle ground here -- as, indeed there is no discussion: these are the songs of two individuals presenting their positions. Lawino complains:.

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Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol

Gerald Moore From the Reviews: "In rewriting his poem in English he has chosen a strong, simple idiom which preserves the sharpness and frankness of this imagery, a structure of short, free verses which flow swiftly and easily, and an uncondescending offer of all that is local and specific to the original W hat survives is enough to offer one of the most varied and exciting contributions yet made to English poetry in Africa. Similarly the illustrative quotes chosen here are merely those the complete review subjectively believes represent the tenor and judgment of the review as a whole. We acknowledge and remind and warn you that they may, in fact, be entirely unrepresentative of the actual reviews by any other measure. Heron notes in his Introduction, Song of Lawino and Song of Ocol: are not songs in any literal sense.

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Song of Lawino & Song of Ocol

Focusing on modern African literature as well as contemporary African cinema, particularly the direct-to-video Nigerian film industry known as Nollywood, the book examines the often-neglected aesthetics of the African comic imagination. In modern African literature, which sometimes creatively traces a path back to African folklore, and in Nollywood — with its aesthetic relationship to Onitsha Market Literature — the pertinent styles range from comic simplicitas to comic magnitude with the facilitation of language, characterization, and plot by a poetics of laughter or lightness as an important aspect of style. The poetics at work is substantially carnivalesque, a comic preference or tendency that is attributable, in different contexts, to a purposeful comic sensibility or an unstructured but ingrained or virtual comic mode. In the best instances of this comic vision, the characteristic laughter or lightness can facilitate a revaluation or reappreciation of the world, either because of the aesthetic structure of signification or the consequent chain of signification.

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